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Chiswick

Chiswick “Chiswick” has an Old English meaning, “Cheese Farm”, and originates from the farms and riverside meadows which are thought to have sustained an annual cheese fair up until the mid 18th century.

Dating to very early times Flint axes were found in numerous parts of Chiswick. This suggests that since the last Ice Age people have been living here. Also, pottery and tools have been found at Chiswick Eyot. Dating back to the 9th/8th BC, A later settlement was excavated opposite Gunnersbury Station. Over 100 skulls retrieved from the Thames, are believed to have been offerings to their Gods from river burials made by Iron Age people (650BC-43AD).

The Romans built two roads through Chiswick which converged at Turnham Green and Roman pottery and building material has been found by the river near St Nicholas Church.

Chiswick High Street There is less evidence for the Saxons, even though they were without doubt in Chiswick. At Corney Reach a Saxon skeleton was found by the river, and other Saxon objects such as a sword pommel, scraps of armour, spearheads and the remains of a shield which were found near the river.

In the 1860s, In Gunnersbury and Bedford Park, Suburban building began. The first Suburbs were designed and built in 1875, on the borders of Chiswick and Acton. Other suburbs of Chiswick include Strand on the Green and Grove Park, which, until the late 18th century, was a fishing hamlet. There are a number of historic public houses in Chiswick. In Strand-on-the-Green there are three main ones. Within the London Borough of Hounslow, a large part of Chiswick falls within the conservation areas.